Movie Theater

I took a sick day and went to the movies. I like to go alone on weekday afternoons. People are at work, and the theaters are nearly empty.  It was Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino, and he badly wanted some poor sonofabitch to get off his lawn.
I chose a central seat a few rows from the front and glanced around to see just one other person sitting, oddly I thought, far away in a back corner.  But to each his own, I decided, and turned my attention back to memories of other Eastwood films I’d seen. Several minutes later, as the previews were winding down, a man strolled down the aisle and sat directly in front of me — as if reporting dutifully to his assigned seat on the second day of tenth grade geometry.  After glancing around the desolate theater a few times to be sure I was not the target of a practical joke or the subject of a social experiment, I began to analyze the possible motives behind this man’s most bizarre seating selection.  I thought mental illness was plausible — but I finally decided that he was somehow oblivious to the imposition, and I’ll have to admit, this triggered a rage response in me, complete with fleeting thoughts of sudden violence.
But then Clint flashed onto the screen with his trademark technicolor scowl, and returning suddenly to myself, I switched to a more suitable seat a few rows back and let the projector’s pale blue opiate glow sing me down to the bliss of no longer knowing.

The Michael Caine Lifestyle

One of my primary concerns about American society is that we haven’t benefited sufficiently from the wisdom of Michael Caine.  In the late 1980s, Caine made a workshop-style acting instruction documentary called Acting in Film.  It’s a fascinating piece of work, full of genuine insights about movie acting.  It’s also a masterpiece of accidental self-parody.
I’ve always held that Caine’s true intention with the video was to teach people about more than just acting.  I like to imagine it’s his manual for everyday living and that he’s encouraging his audience to adopt the Caine lifestyle.  In that spirit, I’ve selected a few key clips and included some of my personal notes about each.  Watch the clips.  Examine my notes.  Live a better life.
Video #1 Notes:
  1. Never change eyes.
  2. Using a single eye, always look into just one of another person’s eyes at a time.
  3. Blinking weakens you. Never blink.
  4. All cameras will love you like a mistress or lover.
  5. Theater actors don’t listen.
Video #1
Video #2 Notes:
  1. Oh! Calcutta! was a naked musical.
  2. Never be nude because things will continue to move.
  3.  Always fight your tears.
Video #2 (in which Caine reflects on some of the lessons from his documentary)
Video #3 Notes:
  1. Focus always ends immediately to the right of your face.
  2. Always move backward and then walk slowly forward when you have something really important to say.
Video #3