Why Poetry?

I’ve had some level of interest in poetry for as long as I can remember, but in recent years, it has occupied a position of much greater significance in my life. As with any topic of deep interest, poetry inspires questions, not the least of which is why. Why poetry? Why does it mean so much to me, especially when so many other people just can’t be bothered?

Poems have the power to draw us deeply into unfamiliar contexts. Take the following poem for example, in which the author, a child of biracial parents, imagines a lighter-skinned version of herself.

Blond
Natasha Trethewey

Certainly it was possible — somewhere
in my parents’ genes the recessive traits
that might have given me a different look:
not attached earlobes or my father’s green eyes,
but another hair color — gentleman-preferred,
have-more-fun blond. And with my skin color,
like a good tan — an even mix of my parents’ —
I could have passed for white.

When on Christmas day I woke to find
a blond wig, a pink sequined tutu,
and a blond ballerina doll, nearly tall as me,
I didn’t know to ask, nor that it mattered,
if there’d been a brown version. This was years before
my grandmother nestled the dark baby
into our creche, years before I’d understand it
as primer for a Mississippi childhood.

Instead, I pranced around our living room
in a whirl of possibility, my parents looking on
at their suddenly strange child. In the photograph
my mother took, my father — almost
out of the frame — looks on as Joseph must have
at the miraculous birth: I’m in the foreground —
my blond wig a shining halo, a newborn likeness
to the child that chance, the long odds,
might have brought.

Few scenarios could lie further from my own experience, but the poem allows me into its private world with such immediacy that I imagine myself in the speaker’s place. I ponder the same questions she does, and I begin to feel what she feels. The context is unique, but the emotions it inspires are universally human. In the space of one short poem, I’ve imagined life in someone else’s shoes – someone with a background far different from mine. Every new poem offers this possibility.

I would argue that there is nothing we need more as human beings than to connect regularly with this level of depth, particularly with people from unfamiliar backgrounds. Article after article will tell you that despite the best efforts of technology, we live in an age of ever-increasing social isolation. Developing a poetry habit can help to bridge this disconnect, and as with any learned behavior, lasting change requires repeated exposure. The ultimate promise of poetry, as Jane Hirshfield writes in her book Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World, is that “by changing ourselves, one by one…,” we might also change “…the outer world that selves create and share.” It may be a cliche to suggest that poetry, or any art, has the power to change the world, but to my ear, it’s a cliche that rings true. Poems have tremendous potential to inspire both personal and social change.

 

Telescope by Louise Glück

Fun with rejections – guest blog post by Alan J. Blaustein — Trish Hopkinson

An entertaining article on publication rejection.


I do NOT pay to publish. When I’m approaching a journal for possible submission, I first check the guidelines for a reading fee and whether they expressly prohibit formal verse (more on this shortly). If no fee and no such proscription, I go to the archives for the first issue. The editors discuss their vision […]

via Fun with rejections – guest blog post by Alan J. Blaustein — Trish Hopkinson

Hello, Poets.

SEND ME POEMS TO SHARE ON THE DIVING BOARD–PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED OR UNPUBLISHED, IT DOESN’T MATTER. I’M JUST LOOKING FOR GOOD STUFF TO SHARE.

My goal is to build an internet poetry community around some common values — as outlined in my Mission. Please reach out using the Contact form if you’re interested, or recommend the site to a friend.

What do I like to see in a poem?

  • a sense of humor – regardless of the subject matter
  • economical use of language
  • some attention paid to sound and rhythm

What do I generally not like to see in a poem?

  • impenetrable verbal gymnastics
  • meaningless bizarro formatting
  • love letters or diary entries about your sexual exploits

What else am I interested in receiving?

  • links to your favorite poems (especially those by lesser-known writers)
  • poetry websites/blogs you enjoy
  • anything you think aligns with the Diving aesthetic (see my Mission for more on that)

The Open Mouse – A site for poems

If you’re looking for a new place to submit your work, take a look at The Open Mouse. To quote the editor, they’re looking for “imaginative use of language, freshness of approach, unusual viewpoints, emotion.” I’ve never visited the site and failed to quickly discover something of interest.

I Am Waiting by Lawrence Ferlinghetti

I’ve been reading some poems about America in anticipation of the 4th, and this is a favorite. The feeling of “perpetually awaiting a rebirth of wonder” is one I connect with strongly. Poetry, for me, is a way of engaging with wonder, or put another way, a means of reveling in the beautifully ambiguous.  Accepting the ambiguous, let alone enjoying it, is not comfortable for many people, and it could be argued that it’s a challenge for Americans in particular.


I am waiting for my case to come up
and I am waiting
for a rebirth of wonder
and I am waiting for someone
to really discover America
and wail
and I am waiting
for the discovery
of a new symbolic western frontier
and I am waiting
for the American Eagle
to really spread its wings
and straighten up and fly right
and I am waiting
for the Age of Anxiety
to drop dead
and I am waiting
for the war to be fought
which will make the world safe
for anarchy
and I am waiting
for the final withering away
of all governments
and I am perpetually awaiting

a rebirth of wonder

I am waiting for the Second Coming
and I am waiting
for a religious revival
to sweep thru the state of Arizona
and I am waiting
for the Grapes of Wrath to be stored
and I am waiting
for them to prove
that God is really American
and I am waiting
to see God on television
piped onto church altars
if only they can find
the right channel
to tune in on
and I am waiting
for the Last Supper to be served again
with a strange new appetizer
and I am perpetually awaiting

a rebirth of wonder

I am waiting for my number to be called
and I am waiting
for the Salvation Army to take over
and I am waiting
for the meek to be blessed
and inherit the earth
without taxes
and I am waiting
for forests and animals
to reclaim the earth as theirs
and I am waiting
for a way to be devised
to destroy all nationalisms
without killing anybody
and I am waiting
for linnets and planets to fall like rain
and I am waiting for lovers and weepers
to lie down together again

in a new rebirth of wonder

I am waiting for the Great Divide to be crossed
and I am anxiously waiting
for the secret of eternal life to be discovered
by an obscure general practitioner
and I am waiting
for the storms of life
to be over
and I am waiting
to set sail for happiness
and I am waiting
for a reconstructed Mayflower
to reach America
with its picture story and tv rights
sold in advance to the natives
and I am waiting
for the lost music to sound again
in the Lost Continent

in a new rebirth of wonder

I am waiting for the day
that maketh all things clear
and I am awaiting retribution
for what America did
to Tom Sawyer
and I am waiting
for Alice in Wonderland
to retransmit to me
her total dream of innocence
and I am waiting
for Childe Roland to come
to the final darkest tower
and I am waiting
for Aphrodite
to grow live arms
at a final disarmament conference

in a new rebirth of wonder

I am waiting
to get some intimations
of immortality
by recollecting my early childhood
and I am waiting
for the green mornings to come again
youth’s dumb green fields come back again
and I am waiting
for some strains of unpremeditated art
to shake my typewriter
and I am waiting to write
the great indelible poem
and I am waiting
for the last long careless rapture
and I am perpetually waiting
for the fleeing lovers on the Grecian Urn
to catch each other up at last
and embrace
and I am awaiting
perpetually and forever

a renaissance of wonder


Offshore Breeze by Andy Powell

Just discovered Offshore Breeze by Andy Powell on Queen Mob’s Tea House.
It really spoke to me — evocative imagery, strong voice, and a good sense of humor.

Click the image to link to the poem.